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Weekly SNAC 30 September 2018: FIT Camp 2018

In just a few weeks now, the youth of SNAC will be enjoying our 10th Annual FIT Camp. We’ll be getting stuck into God’s word to us in Hebrews and seeing how Jesus is better than angels (as mediators of God’s saving word), Moses (the law and the old covenant) and our earthly possessions and hopes.In just a few weeks now, the youth of SNAC will be enjoying our 10th Annual FIT Camp. We’ll be getting stuck into God’s word to us in Hebrews and seeing how Jesus is better than angels (as mediators of God’s saving word), Moses (the law and the old covenant) and our earthly possessions and hopes.

At this point in the term, we need to start finalising our arrangements, so please be praying for the leaders as they bring all the various elements of camp together - talks, music, activities, Bible studies, sessions, seminars and a whole lot of logistics! Many of the youth themselves are preparing to serve in these elements of camp too, so keep them in your prayers as well. 

Please be praying for our youth too, that God will use this time to help them grow in their faith. Here are a couple of quotes from veteran youth and children’s workers that point out why camps are such great times for teenagers to develop ties to the faith community and mature in faith:

‘Camps are a great way for … groups in churches to get away from their normal routine and learn more about God and each other. They give children the opportunity to develop closer relationships with their peers and leaders in a fun and enjoyable environment. Even the act of making a bed, setting a table or cleaning is somehow more fun on a camp than it is at home.’
Dr. Kaye Chalwell, Former Director of Curriculum and Teacher Quality, Youthworks

‘Important things happen when you leave the routine of normal daily life. Time away just seems to lead to growth… camp provides the best opportunity to live as a community of wholehearted disciples, even if it’s only for a few days. Camps offer your group more time and space for reflection, more concentrated teaching, more experiences of life together and a great surge of momentum for the following few months of youth group.’
Scott Petty, ‘Tactics for Teen Ministry’         

If you are a teenager or have a teenager – make sure you register now (registration closes TODAY)! This is an opportunity for Christian growth that is too good to miss.

Brendan Moar

                FIT CAMP 2018
When: Thurs 11th - Sun 14th October 
Where: Youthworks, Deer Park 
Cost: $280
Register online at www.snac.org.au/fit

 

Weekly SNAC 23 September 2018: Happy 1st Birthday 4:30 Arvo Church!

In September 2017 SNAC’s newest church congregation opened the doors for the 4:30pm Arvo Church at Bexley North.  Last Sunday we celebrated our 1st Birthday and we wanted to invite everyone across SNAC to give thanks to God for the year we’ve had.In September 2017 SNAC’s newest church congregation opened the doors for the 4:30pm Arvo Church at Bexley North.  Last Sunday we celebrated our 1st Birthday and we wanted to invite everyone across SNAC to give thanks to God for the year we’ve had.

The 4:30 Church started small with a team of just under 20 people. Throughout Spring in 2017 and leading up to Christmas we advertised, door-knocked in the local area and made personal invites. As a result we have seen many visitors come through, we’ve had the joy of being involved in several people coming to know Jesus, we’ve connected some people to the Carlton ESL classes, we’ve helped encourage people who had stopped attending church to come back, we’ve found Christians in our local area looking for a local church and there has been much joy in serving and growing together in Christ. It has been a real joy to see close to 40 people join with us most weeks in the last month.

Our weekly meetings are not vastly different to any that you might attend at SNAC – we read the Bible, pray, sing and hear a sermon - but in the first 12 months we have tried a number of different ideas to create our own culture. We have been blessed with Barista quality coffee before our services each week. We have developed a culture of interacting during the service on a particular relevant topic each week. We’ve found ways to have excellent music and singing each week with a small but faithful group of musicians and we’ve seen lots of people join in and exercise their gifts for the sake of our small new church. We’ve also had the pleasure of enjoying meals together after church most weeks thanks to our excellent servant hearted cooks. We are very thankful to God for his work so far and we look forward to his continued work through us. At the moment we are running a Christianity Explained group for 4:30pm people and we are looking ahead to reaching out into our community this Spring and Summer.

Please join us in thanking God for his continued work. Pray for unity and endurance with joy for all of us. Pray that God would bring many more people to know Jesus and bless our efforts to reach the many new people in the Bexley North area for the Gospel.

Jason Veitch

Weekly SNAC, 16 September 2018 - Making disciples of all nations

In Matthew 28, we see Jesus command his disciples to “Go, therefore, and make disciples of all nations”. As we look at our local area, it’s pretty clear that there are people who have come from many different places and who now live in Australia. In fact, if we think about Jesus’ words in Matt 28, the good news is that we don’t actually have to go very far at all to obey this command. If you started walking down your street, it won’t take you long to find a neighbour who has a very different background to your own! And yet, many of us find it surprisingly easy to go through the week and avoid any meaningful conversation with someone who is different to us. Perhaps you could set yourself the challenge of introducing yourself to one of your neighbours and inviting them around for a meal?In Matthew 28, we see Jesus command his disciples to “Go, therefore, and make disciples of all nations”. As we look at our local area, it’s pretty clear that there are people who have come from many different places and who now live in Australia. In fact, if we think about Jesus’ words in Matt 28, the good news is that we don’t actually have to go very far at all to obey this command. If you started walking down your street, it won’t take you long to find a neighbour who has a very different background to your own! And yet, many of us find it surprisingly easy to go through the week and avoid any meaningful conversation with someone who is different to us. Perhaps you could set yourself the challenge of introducing yourself to one of your neighbours and inviting them around for a meal?

One way that a group of us have been proclaiming Jesus to those in our local community is by hosting a number of ‘International Dinners’ at St James. We held our second dinner last Saturday and it was a great night. We had around 50 adults and 20 kids join together to share food from many different countries. The evening started with a Tongan musical item sung by Netane, Lama and Louisa. The audience was encouraged to join in with the actions as we sung ‘There’s no one, there’s no one like Jesus’ (or in Tongan, ‘Ikai ha taha tatau mo Sisu’). Over dinner, Rick explained Mark 1:15 and shared the testimony of the Philippian Jailer from Acts 16. We also heard a video testimony from Fergus and the testimony of Ally who was interviewed on the night. After the talk, people were encouraged to discuss the question – “What do you think is ‘good’ about the ‘good news’ of Jesus”? It was encouraging to hear of lots of gospel conversations shared during the night. 
                    
Please join us in giving thanks for those who came on the night and please be praying that many would be interested in hearing more about Jesus. If you would be interested in bringing along a guest to our next international dinner or would like some encouragement in how to share the gospel with people around you, please let me know. I’d love to speak to you!

Kevin Stepniewski

Weekly SNAC, 9 September 2018 - “Everyone a child should know”

As a family we are always on the lookout for resources for reading the Bible with our kids. I think every family knows the struggle of trying to keep family devotionals a regular part of life. As our children have gotten older and started reading the Bible for themselves, we’ve started to read other books together over the dinner table (on the nights when we are all there!) as well as talking about what we have all read in our own Bible reading.As a family we are always on the lookout for resources for reading the Bible with our kids. I think every family knows the struggle of trying to keep family devotionals a regular part of life. As our children have gotten older and started reading the Bible for themselves, we’ve started to read other books together over the dinner table (on the nights when we are all there!) as well as talking about what we have all read in our own Bible reading.

This year we’ve been reading “Everyone a child should know” by Clare Heath-Whyte and we’ve really enjoyed it. Stories of faithful Christians doing great things for God are always encouraging and that’s what this book does. It tells the story of 52 Christians who have faithfully served Jesus with their life (each one in just one or two pages). Some of the people are famous (Billy Graham, Augustine, Martin Luther) but others you may never have heard of (Mary Jones, Hannah More). Though it’s aimed at primary school aged children our teenagers have enjoyed it also and it’s lead to good discussions around our dinner table.

Here is one of the stories to give you a taste – Adoniram Judson (1788-1850) –

Who first told you about Jesus? Your parents? Your friend? Someone at church or school?

Adoniram Judson didn’t become Jesus’ friend until he was a grown up, but he had always known about Jesus – from his parents, church and school. But Adoniram knew that some people in the world would never hear about Jesus from their parents. He knew that there were places in the world where almost nobody had heard about Jesus at all – places like Burma. No one from America had ever gone overseas to tell people about Jesus before – but Adoniram decided to go.

Burma was very different from America. The people spoke a different language – so Adoniram learnt it. The people wore different clothes – so Adoniram wore them. No one knew about Jesus – so Adoniram told them. He told lots and lots of Burmese people – but nobody wanted to listen. He told more and more Burmese people. Finally, after six    whole years of telling Burmese people about Jesus, one Burmese man became Jesus’ friend.

Adoniram kept going. He put the bible into the Burmese language so more people could find out about Jesus. He was ill, he was put in prison, his wife died, his children died – but Adoniram kept going. By the time Adoniram died thousands of Burmese people had become Jesus’ friends.

Phil Colgan